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Any INTP's out there? (MBTI Myers Briggs Carl Jung)
  • jackfrost
    Posts: 37
    I'm an INTP, also diagnosed with PDD-NOS which means I'm possibly in the autistic spectrum. I'm most likely NVLD (Non-verbal learning disorder) according to my psychiatrist.

    If you know what INTP is though, it almost makes sense that an INTP would be diagnosed with something like this. We are very out of touch with emotions. The Aneros is a very emotional experience set in the stage of feelings.

    After 2 years, using Marijuana is the only thing that can help me to get to real mini-o's and recently for the first time a real Dry-O. I've never experienced a super-O.

    Anyone else an INTP or INTJ? I'd love to hear your experience with the Aneros.
  • rumelrumel
    Posts: 2,257
    jackfrost,

    I'm an INTP too and the biggest problem I have is the incessant "mind noise" and internal dialogue that needs to be quieted to fully appreciate the Aneros experience. I've related bits of my experiences throughout this forum so I'm not going to try and recount them all here again.
    Take heart in your ability to effectively manage the tremendous emotional power of your nature it will deepen the significance of the Super-O when you do experience it.
  • jackfrost
    Posts: 37
    rumel,

    That's great that you have experienced your own super-o. I have lots of mind noise, usually analytical in nature. Every new feeling I have causes me to analyze what happened as if I am trying to record the path. If my brain is more worried about understanding what I am feeling, then I don't get very far. If I let go then I feel more than I ever thought possible and I've had dry-O's. The problem for me has been being able to let go of analyzing what is happening so that I can fully experience what I am feeling.

    Sometimes I just feel insane...
  • rookrook
    Posts: 1,604
    As an ESTJ I think it's largely the "T" that sets off the 'Monkey brain.' I try to counterbalance my "J" by undertaking Spirituality studies -- no religious stuff but more like the Shinto approach to spirit existing in inanimate objects such as rocks, flowers etc. Also, bestowing blessings on all of nature that I encounter. (people, animals, flowers, rocks, trees, etc.)

    The "T" thing got "tackled" with a heavy dose of meditation going into each session. Zazen for 20-30 minutes seems to get the brain settled. While that may seem like a lot of time spent doing, "nothing," it has returned wonders. Using Zazen, enables me to open the window to orgasm as I begin my arousal phase.

    Early this year our Tai Chi group picked up a new master who teaches each form with a heavy dose of meditation on each transition. He asks us to reach into our feelings regarding each transition in a form. whole new approach to Martial Arts!

    I've not pursued Yoga but my wife has and describes our approach to forms as driven by Yoga. This 'meditation within motion' is a great discipline so that meditative thought can be played in tune with pleasure waves and the body's natural contractions during Aneros practice. It seems to couple with spirituality and emphasizes the goodness within each approach to orgasm.
  • thhn
    Posts: 425
    [QUOTE=jackfrost;96651]rumel,

    That's great that you have experienced your own super-o. I have lots of mind noise, usually analytical in nature. Every new feeling I have causes me to analyze what happened as if I am trying to record the path. If my brain is more worried about understanding what I am feeling, then I don't get very far. If I let go then I feel more than I ever thought possible and I've had dry-O's. The problem for me has been being able to let go of analyzing what is happening so that I can fully experience what I am feeling.

    Sometimes I just feel insane...

    that's a great point jackfrost and I believe I am in the same catagory as you. My journey has been ever so slow but patience has its rewards. I think I would make great strides if I could quiet my mind and keep it on course
  • I think that if you start your session with some hope that it's going to be different than the last one, you are already off on the wrong foot. That is not letting go of your expectations. If think if someone wants to shorten their learning curve, they should find some reason to like it that is readily attainable, and then use it for that reason. Then you can get into it and let your mind go. And at that point, I would wager that things will progress expeditiously.

    The whole 'letting go of your expectations' thing is really talked up around here. In my opinion, this is bad terminology. What might be better is 'stop thinking about it'.

    But it took me forever, so what do I know?
  • rumelrumel
    Posts: 2,257
    jackfrost,

    I forgot to add that I also have shades of the INFP personality type. FYI, some of your fellow INTP's are Albert Einstein, Thomas Jefferson, Marie Currie, Charles Darwin, David Keirsay, George Soros, Gregory Peck, Harper Lee and Robert Rosen.

    For those of you who would like to know your personality type, you can take a free online test here.
  • INTJ here, never super Oed, lots of over analysis during Aneros and KSMO practise, can't access feelings easily, trouble showing emotion, can't pick up subtle emotions in others (they have to bawling, then I'll say, Is there something wrong?) I can fix stuff and lift heavy things though.
    I have experienced some nice feelings through Aneros use and KSMO has taught me a lot about myself and I have enjoyed some success with that.
    Enjoy the journey Jackfrost, I'm just smelling the flowers from now on, enjoying every second.

    I posted ages ago about this very subject after I took the test....buggered if I can find it now!
  • PepnauticPepnautic
    Posts: 29
    I have taken a couple of online MBTI tests only - no certified or complex ones. I often get INTP as the result, but sometimes ISTP, INTJ or ISTJ. The I and the T are my strongest indicators (N/S and P/J somewhat weaker).

    I am also diagnosed with Asperger syndrome (at the age of 34, probably late), specifically difficulties with social relationships.

    As can be read elsewhere in some of my few posts, blog entries (and videos) here, I have had great success with the Aneros. On the other hand, I also started anal play ten years before finding the Aneros, which possibly gave me a head start.
  • kharrisma
    Posts: 29
    Close, but no cigar... INFP. Also diagnosed with asperger's syndrome (at 56 years old). I too have the "never shuts up" mind... puts me in mind of being at a large party, in a large, noisy room. I'm *desperate* to find a door to the balcony, so I can step out into relative silence and coolness. It definitely interferes with simply "being" and feeling. Tough to just experience a feeling when your overclocked cerebellum wants to analyze it! Maybe I should look into Zen meditation; is it something that can be learned through reading and practice, or must one be taught in person by a person?
  • priapusonepriapusone
    Posts: 257
    I love the silence and the coolness!
  • artformartform
    Posts: 1,484
    Friend rumel and I did the online tests at the same time, jackfrost.

    I did a couple of different versions of the test and was INTP and/or ENTP. A review of my behavioural and medical history suggests that I was a high functioning Aspergers case in my youth. There were things I did not like about my reactions to certain things and at about ages 12-14 decided to make changes in my life and adopted some retraining/rewiring behaviours that worked. I think that explains the Introvert/Extrovert duality in my results.

    from artform's reply to rumel at KSMO:
    re:ENTP/INTP and the tests, it is really the differences in wording in the different tests' questions. The questions/statements in the four section simple Cognitive Style Inventory on the page to which you provided the link for MBTI clearly had me INTP.

    Both the Keirsey and the P100 extensive questionaires showed a mix of both E and I in their detailed results documentation, with the extrovert/introvert needs/behaviours as complementary, and both showed the E as the stronger of the two (therefore ENTP), but the need/expression of both being a defining characteristic in itself.



    Thanks again R! Thomas Jefferson is a major hero of mine. Einstein and Darwin, I much admire. George Soros, one of the few men of extreme wealth who I admire, for his values, activist commitments, and his extensive Open Society organizations' many social development investments.

    all the best making the best of what and who we each uniquely are rewiring as we go all

    artform
  • ten_s_nutten_s_nut
    Posts: 818
    kharrisma;

    FWIW, I'm close but no cigar as well: ISTP.

    Talking about Zen techniques used to silence the mind, my own experience was that the books helped, but I didn't really get it to happen until I had a "guru" help me in person. He could read my body language and tell when I was relaxed enough for the exercises to work.

    Best Regards,

    Dave
  • jackfrost
    Posts: 37
    [QUOTE=rumel;96655]jackfrost,

    I forgot to add that I also have shades of the INFP personality type. FYI, some of your fellow INTP's are Albert Einstein, Thomas Jefferson, Marie Currie, Charles Darwin, David Keirsay, George Soros, Gregory Peck, Harper Lee and Robert Rosen.

    For those of you who would like to know your personality type, you can take a free online test here.


    Ah, that would help you in your journey I would think. The T in my INTP is _very_ strong.

    I've also struggled in life with anxiety and depression of which I am just learning about and improving on at 32 years of age. Letting go and 'not thinking' is very challenging for me. The thought of 'doing nothing' is actually down right upsetting. For some reason, doing nothing = extreme boredom and my mind tells me it's unacceptable. Sometimes I don't feel so strongly about it, but most of the time I do. Marijuana (I have a license for other reasons) helps tremendously, but I can tell that it also takes something away.
  • jackfrost
    Posts: 37
    That's great you were diagnosed. Just don't let it label you, use it to find out more about yourself by studying other's that have the same diagnosis. Check this book out, it's written by an Aspergarian Savant. He's an electrical engineering genius, had a rich life, even working for Pink Floyd designing custom guitars that shoot rockets and catch on fire etc in the 1980's as well as pioneering sound processing equipment. He wrote another book, about his life called "Look me in the eye", it was really great, but this one is more on understanding yourself, being yourself, being different.: Amazon.com: Be Different: Adventures of a Free-Range Aspergian with Practical Advice for Aspergians, Misfits, Families & Teachers (9780307884817): John Elder Robison: Books

    I was diagnosed PDD-NOS, possible NVLD (Non-verbal learning disorder), both can be mistaken for Aspergers unless you 'look closely'. I have some fundamental differences in processing but these Aspergers books are so helpful for me as well.
  • jackfrost
    Posts: 37
    Meditation should help. I can't really recommend this, but Marijuana (legal for me), has opened the door the most in my journey both in life and around the Aneros. I was diagnosed PDD-NOS, also have an 'overclocked' cerebellum, and my natural tendancy at 'rest' is to be analyzing something. It takes conscious effort to 'feel' and 'listen' to my body, if I am tired or have anxiety, I can't do it at all and it's taken 2 years of practice just to get as far as Mini-O's and a single good Dry-O.
  • The_BishopThe_Bishop
    Posts: 810
    I'm a INTJ, the weed makes it easier to get into the "zone" for an aneros session.
  • I'll second this. I'm an INTJ, and Medical Marijuana has done WONDERS for helping me to relax and let go, and for waking up my prostate.

    I've been Anerosing for about 1.5 years now, and I am just now getting to the point where I am getting
    intense prostate action, and fairly easily at that. For a long time, not much of anything. Now, as soon as I
    insert (Tempo, face down seems to be best for me), I get excellent prostate action.

    No SuperO yet, I think, but I am really, really enjoying the journey...
  • A fantastic thread from a great contributor here, thanks to rook, this was a real eye opener for me.
  • Apparently INFP myself (100/50/25/33), and I've never even tried weed. Not that I hold some aversion to it, but that I have lots of concern for U.S. drug policy on my life.