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the tempo
  • needit_
    Posts: 34
    must ask as i am more than a tad qurious about the tempo ..is it like the plastic ones as in the construction,2 halves um glued to gether or is it ? a lite gauge stainless steel? blown mould ? if so what gauge is it ? .cant believe that this company would sell some thing that would say colapse inside a persons body ..but as mentioned more than a tad qurious ...as i am from canada..ont to be more precise has any stores that cary your products ordered any of these ? yep a lot of questions thx for reading much appreciate
  • rumelrumel
    Posts: 2,257
    needit_,

    First you can check out the Aneros web page ad, then you can read The Tempo: Intense Elegance thread and also my own review.
  • cyrezcyrez
    Posts: 109
    I believe (can't say for sure) that the tempo is made in a computer controlled lathe (CNC Turning), thats a device where it spins a rod around and then feed a cutting tool into the turning rod to make shapes (it's symmetrical all around). The material is one of the highest quality available (medical grade stainless steel) and it's polished to perfection. So it's one solid object that will last a millenia =)

    If you're curious how they managed to do the base of the tempo, since its nonsymmetrical (it got a oval base), it's most likely done in something called a two axes lathe, where you have several axis of rotation, and if you rotate both axis at the same time in a certain rotion ratio, you get a oval shape

    (you got a smaller turning radius inside a bigger turning radius, so the center of the turning object moves around)
  • Badger
    Posts: 654
    How about a casting, like investment casting? They can produce surface textures in comparable smoothness to machined surfaces; Ruger casts the receivers of their guns, and there's very little that they have to machine. After casting, they can be tumble polished and then buffed to mirror-like smoothness. There would be considerably less waste and minimal manufacturing processes involved. Mine has a small non-symmetrical dimple on the tail end (handle?), which would support my theory of manufacture - a surface bubble or other imperfection that got smoothed to a dimple.
  • rookrook
    Posts: 1,604
    Not having seen one yet (whine), I'd bet on the investment casting. Gud 'nuff for most golf irons. (save for the heavy hitters who luv forgings)
  • Cyrez is absolutely correct on his assessment of the Tempo construction in my opinion. This is a solid model not a hollow cast.
    I too upon examination had the feeling of the lathe production. Years ago I worked in a machine shop and it has all the earmarks of such.
  • needit_
    Posts: 34
    hi gang and many thx for the info...did any body with 1 happen to weigh it ? yep just a pain i can be .more qurious as mentioned ..some body did mention it was a tad heavier,than th others and just wondered about the weight .will try to order 1 for my self or try to pick 1 up in my travels through the u s a ...as being a traveling man ..they ship with ups great terrific delievery carrier but after the 3rd try they send itens back ..and when i am out for up to 2 wks at a time makes it difficult to get shippments delievered,to my home ...thx
  • cyrezcyrez
    Posts: 109
    I think someone mentioned 5 ounces, if i remember it correctly...thats about 141 grams for the metric dudes and dudettes out there

    [QUOTE=Badger;94058]How about a casting, like investment casting? They can produce surface textures in comparable smoothness to machined surfaces; Ruger casts the receivers of their guns, and there's very little that they have to machine. After casting, they can be tumble polished and then buffed to mirror-like smoothness. There would be considerably less waste and minimal manufacturing processes involved. Mine has a small non-symmetrical dimple on the tail end (handle?), which would support my theory of manufacture - a surface bubble or other imperfection that got smoothed to a dimple.

    Casting is ofcourse a valid method for production, and then they can make complicated shapes, not just the symmetrical ones, but also all the models in the aneros lineup. But i don't think this is possible for small scale production in a small company, probably outsourced to a external manufacturer in that case.

    It's probably a little bit easier to buy a CNC machine and have it makes models 24/7, then its just a machine that can stand in a corner without fuss or much attention. When you do advanced casting, things get a little bit more complicated. You have to have personell that does all the things, making molds, and heating up metal to liquid state (and this also takes lots of energy) and then doing the casting etc. Not to mention all the equpiment that is required for advanced casting. While this is certanly possible and very economical in larger production facilities (and smaller metal workshops that specilizes in casting?), i'm not sure if that's the 'aneros' way. But i guess its all up for speculation. I just wish aneros could spill the beans on some of the *magic*, kinda a behind the scenes, with pics on their facility, the people that makes the aneros, production, different machines. R&D etc,
  • Badger
    Posts: 654
    I suspect that they might farm out the castings: I was looking at the Njoy website, and I noticed that some of their polished stainless devices are stored in a fancy, black, magnet-latched box with a red silk/satin lining. Sound familiar?

    I still think that investment casting would be the less-expensive method of manufacture. Machining takes round stock, some time to turn it down to shape, then turn down the handle (tail?) to its shape, then buff it all down smooth. When you're done, there's all of that material that's waste that has to be disposed of.

    The wax models can be quite simple to make with master molds, then have a slurry poured around them, fire it to cure the mold, and then pour the metal into the mold. When cool, break the mold, and then buff them to the mirror-like luster. Much of this can easily and inexpensively outsourced to a local foundry that specializes in investment casting.

    Maybe the best thing to do is to ask the company how they're made.

    Well?
  • B MayfieldB Mayfield
    Posts: 2,077
    Guys,

    My recollection is that
    Tempo is indeed a turned (lathed) product. I'll try to get a confirmation on that.

    BF Mayfield
  • rookrook
    Posts: 1,604
    I'm still with Badger on this one:

    If they are machining the Tempo, it might be good to consider a cast product. Advantages:
    Scalability of production.
    Cost.
    Single source availability.
    Improved product design security (foundry works from sample rather than shop drawings)

    Good run-down on investment casting of club heads:
    -- myOstrich Golf - Golf Tech Talk :: Investment Casting; by Jeff Jackson --
    Example of high investment cast 'clones' of club heads ($16 is a retail price):
    -- Golf Club Components - Wedges --

    Foundaries and processes:
    -- Stainless Steel Investment Casting - Stainless Steel Castings | Milwaukee Precision Casting --
    -- YouTube - Investment Casting Video - Milwaukee Precision Castings --
    -- EMP | Home --
    -- YouTube - A.W.Bell Investment Casting Foundry Tour --

    Ceramic (Shaw Process) casting
    -- Ceramic Mold Castings & Investment Castings | Bimac Corporation, Ohio --
  • If you look at the Tempo, you can see the very fine horizontal lines. To me that indicates CNC lathe production.